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Research Topics
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 Research Topics    |    Major Focus Areas
Research Topics
ACCIDENTS & INJURIES
BONE, JOINT & MUSCLE
BRAIN & NERVOUS
CANCER
CARDIOVASCULAR
CHEMICAL WARFARE
DIGESTIVE HEALTH
ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
FAMILY HEALTH
GENERAL HEALTH & PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS
GENETIC STUDIES
HEALTH RESEARCH OF ALLIED FORCES
IMMUNE/BLOOD SYSTEM
INFECTIONS
LUNG & RESPIRATORY
MENTAL HEALTH
MILITARY WORKING DOGS
MORTALITY/DEATH
REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH/OUTCOMES
SLEEP DISORDER
Treatment
VACCINES & PROTECTIVE MEDICATIONS
General Health & Physical Symptoms
General
Project Summary

Title: Follow-Up Investigation of troops exposed to nerve agents at Aberdeen Proving Ground (Pilot Study) (See also DoD-116A; formerly VA/DoD-2VA/2DA)
Synopsis: A survey by telephone to the Edgewood chemical warfare subjects who were exposed to anticholinesterase agents for the more common operational exposure-associated outcomes; neurological deficits, particularly peripheral never disease, and neuropsychological impairment, including sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression.
Overall Project Objective: Between 1955 and 1975, the U.S. Army enrolled 6,720 soldiers in an experimental exposure program of chemical warfare and other agents at the Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland. In 1980 the Army asked the National Research Council (NRC) to study the possible long term health effects of these exposures. A three-volume report was issued, the last volume dealing with the current health status of test subjects, including 1,581 men exposed to anticholinesterase compounds such as GA (tabun), GB (sarin), GD (soman), GF, and VX. The report indicated that "the limited information available from the follow-up on these soldiers does not permit definitive conclusions regarding the nature and extent of possible long-term problems resulting from chemical exposure at Edgewood." A pilot study was undertaken to determine whether follow-up of these test subjects was feasible and whether it would provide useful information. Taking the suggestion of the NRC committee, we proposed to survey by telephone the Edgewood subjects who were exposed to anticholinesterase agents for the more common OP exposure-associated outcomes; neurological deficits, particularly perpheral never disease, and neuropsychological impairment, including sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression.
Status/Results to Date: The full scale project has been funded. (New project is listed as DoD-93).
Project:VA-63A
Agency:Department Of Veterans' Affairs
Location:Institute of Medicine/Medical Follow-Up Agency
P.I. Name:William Page, Ph. D.
Research Type:Epidemiology
Research Focus:Chemical Weapons
Focus Category:General Health & Physical Symptoms
Status:Complete
Study Start Date:
Estimated Completion Date:December 31,1997
Specific Aims: To conduct a pilot study to determine if it is feasible to follow up on soldiers exposed to anticholinesterase agents at the Edgewood Arsenal.
Methodology: The Edgewood subjects who were exposed to chemical agents served as the first control group. However, this was not an ideal control group because the original Edgewood protocol did not include random assignment of subjects to treatment and control groups. In particular, it was thought that healthier men were more likely to have been assigned to chemical exposure groups, thus the second control group consisted of men who were exposed to chemical agents other than anticholinesterases were included in the follow-up. A screen by telephone questionnaire of all exposed subjects and controls for neurological deficit and neuropsychological impairment, including sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression was conducted.
Most Recent Publications:

Page WF. Long-term health effects of exposure to sarin and other anticholinesterase chemical warfare agents. Military Medicine, 168(3):239-45. Mar 2003. Abstract