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Research Topics
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 Research Topics    |    Major Focus Areas
Research Topics
ACCIDENTS & INJURIES
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BRAIN & NERVOUS
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DIGESTIVE HEALTH
ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
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General
Project Summary

Title: Acute and Long-Term Impact of Deployment to Southwest Asia on the Physical and Mental Health of Soldiers and their Families
Synopsis: A study to determine the short and long-term impact of deployment to Southwest Asia on the physical and mental health of soldiers and their families.
Overall Project Objective: Determine the acute and long-term impact of deployment to SWA on the physical and mental health of soldiers and their families.
Status/Results to Date: An assessment of psychological factors related to deployment stress and family separation during Operation Desert Shield/Storm was conducted with a stratified sample of married and single U.S. Army Individual Ready Reserve soldiers two years post ODS. Analyses were performed in 1994 with final report completed in spring of 1995 and submitted to Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. Deployment stress and adaptation was studied on a large sample of U.S. Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve Unit soldiers who activated and deployed for Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Physiological stress, distress, coping and factors related to current deployed effects of family separation were assessed. Physiological well-being was studied with respect to deployment location factors. Persian Gulf Region analyses were performed in summer of 1995 and resulted in a manuscript on the long term effects of Desert Storm on the Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers and their families relative to: deployment stress and adaptation (more specifically: physiological stress, distress, coping, factors related to current deployed effects of family separation, and deployment location factors.
Project:DoD-23
Agency:Department Of Defense
Location:Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
P.I. Name:John Stuart, MAJ
Research Type:Epidemiology
Research Focus:Brain & Nervous System
Focus Category:General Health & Physical Symptoms
Status:Complete
Study Start Date:October 01,1993
Estimated Completion Date:September 01,1997
Specific Aims: Determine the acute and long-term impact of deployment to SWA on the physical and mental health of soldiers organizational, and environmental factors within military units that produce psychiatric casualties. Identify the critical indicators resulting in increased risk and assess the long-term consequences of exposure to trauma. Develop recommendations on post-deployment interventions. Determine impacts of Army family support policies and programs on active duty and reserve component soldiers and their families. Develop recommendations on post-deployment interventions.
Methodology: Interviews and surveys of soldiers and leaders participating in ODS were conducted several times prior to the ground war, immediately after the ground war, and at intervals following return home. Soldiers and their spouses were surveyed and interviewed in order to evaluate the social, psychological, organizational, and environmental factors within military units that produce psychiatric casualties, lead to dysfunctional behavior and decrements in military performance, generate psychomatic illness and increased susceptibility to physical illness. The family-community research team performed field surveys of spouses of active duty and reserve component (USAR) and (ARNG) soldiers from units deployed to the Persian Gulf for ODS on deployment-related stressors and psychological symptoms, spouse support-seeking behavior, family perceptions of Army support and assistance, stress-coping responses, and family well-being during reunion with returning soldiers and in the aftermath of ODS. Surveys and interviews of selected Reserve and National Guard units and their families have been conducted during the period following ODS, while additional interviews and surveys were conducted with soldiers and families participating in Operation Just Cause and Sinai peacekeeping deployments.
Most Recent Publications:

Rothberg JM, Harrison NL, Fullerton CS. Combat service support survey results: A light infantry division and a mechanized infantry division. Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, AD#ADA278203, Jul 1989. Technical Report

Rothberg JM. Epidemiological considerations regarding the health and effectiveness of women in the armed forces. Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, AD#ADA278202, Jun 1984. Technical Report

Stuart J, Bliese PD. The Long Term Effects of Operation Desert Storm on the Psychological Well-Being of US Army Reserve and National Guard Veterans. J Applied Social Psychology, 28 1, PP 1-22, Jan 1998. Article

Stuart J, Halverson RR. The Psychological status of U.S. Army soldiers during recent military operations. Military Medicine, 162 (11): 737-43, Nov 1997. Abstract